Tutorial to learn EXCEL with Microsoft


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Formation Excel en ligne par vidéo

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MICROSOFT EXCEL

(“THE END OF THE BEGNING”)

MICROSOFT EXCEL

(“THE END OF THE BEGNING”) TABLE OF CONTENTS

1)  Basic Terms and Parts of the Screen .3

2)  Moving from Cell to Cell .3

3)  Format cells in a spreadsheet ..4

4)  Naming your Worksheets ..5

6)   Formulas: Entering and Manipulating Data 6

7)   Apply cell formatting .10

8)   Printing ..10

9)   Window Spilt & Freeze .11

10)   Auto Correct ..11

11)   Auto Fill 12

12)   Data Validation .13

13)   Sum Function .13

14)   Sort 14

16)   Auto Filter ..15

17)   Advanced Filter .16

18)   Text Functions 16

19)   USEFUL FUNCTIONS 17

20)   WORKSHEET PROTECTION 19

21)   Conditional Formatting ..20

22)   Pivot Tables 21

23)   Vlookup 23

24)   HLookup function .26

25)   Using Charts in Excel ..27

26)   Establishing Links Between Worksheets or Workbooks 39

27)   Macros .41

 1) Basic Terms and Parts of the Screen

Workbook- term used to describe an entire Excel file.

Worksheet- (or just Sheet): the individual page within each workbook.

Each workbook starts out with 3 sheets.

Can add up to 255 sheets.

The tab of the active sheet is bold.

Range name box- lists the address of the cell currently selected.

Formula bar- When you enter information into a cell, anything you type appears in the Formula bar. You can edit text in this bar or in the cell itself. This is also where you enter mathematical formulas.

Each worksheet is made up of columns (vertical sections) and rows (horizontal sections).

The point where the rows and columns intersect is a cell (the little squares).

Cells are identified with a letter and a number that refer to the column and row where it is located—this is the cell’s address.  For example the cell address A1 refers to the intersection of column A and row 1 and the cell address C6 refers to the intersection of column C and row 6.

Sheet name tabs are shown along the bottom for each sheet within the workbook. This allows you access different sheets within a workbook.

The Data Region is the area of a worksheet that contains data (as opposed to headings, etc.)

2) Moving from Cell to Cell

To select a cell, click in the middle of it. A thick, black border will appear.

To edit a cell, double click in the middle of it. A thinner, black border will appear and the cursor will appear in the cell OR use F2 function key from the keyboard.

To move:

Use the keyboard:

Up, down, left, right

Arrow keys

Left or right

Tab key or Shift key + Tab key

Up or down one window

Page Up or Page Down key

To the farthest cell in the data region in a given direction

Ctrl key + Arrow key

To the beginning of the row

Home key

To the beginning of the sheet

Ctrl key + Home key

To the last cell containing data in the sheet

Ctrl key + End key

To go to a specific cell

F5 key (GOTO) then enter the cell address

3 ) Format cells in a spreadsheet  .

Formatting Text in Cells

To Automatically Wrap Text

Highlight the cells, rows or columns you want.

Then click Format on the Menu bar then click Cells. Click on the Alignment tab, click in the Wrap Text check box, and then click OK.

To Change the Font, Font Size, etc

Highlight the cells, rows or columns you want.

Then click Format on the Menu bar then click Cells. Select the appropriate font, size, color, etc for the cell (whether it be text or numbers).

Click OK.

When you create a new worksheet, all cells are formatted with the General number format.

When it can, Microsoft Excel automatically assigns the correct number format to your entry. For example, when you enter a number that contains a dollar sign before the number, Microsoft Excel automatically changes the cell's format to a currency format.

If a number is too long to be displayed in a cell, Excel displays a series of number signs (####) in the cell. If you widen the column enough to accommodate the width of the number, the number is displayed in the cell.

To Change the Formatting of Cells Containing Numeric Values

Highlight the cells, rows or columns you want.

Then click Format on the Menu bar then click Cells. From the Category list, choose the type of number you wish to format.

Depending on the category you select, the right side of the Format Cells dialog box will display some options for that category. Make your selections then click OK. Merging Cells

To Enter Text that Binds Several Cells Enter text into a cell. 

Select the range of cells you want the text to occupy by clicking on the first cell in your range, and then drag your mouse across the cells you want to merge.

Click the Merge and Center button on the Formatting toolbar.

4) Naming your Worksheets

When you open a new workbook, three sheets are displayed by default. These are generically labeled. To Rename Worksheets

Make sure the worksheet you wish to rename is selected or active.

Click Format on the Menu bar, point Sheet, and then click Rename.

The sheet name tab of the current worksheet will become highlighted. Just start typing the name you want. Click anywhere in your worksheet when you are finished.

Alternative Method to Rename Worksheets                                          

Double click on the tab for the sheet you want to rename OR F2 function from the Keyboard.

The sheet name tab of the current worksheet will become highlighted. Just start typing the name you want. Click anywhere in your worksheet when you are finished.

5) Add or delete new columns, rows, or worksheets.

Adding Columns, Rows, or New Worksheets

To Insert Columns

Select the column that is to the right of where you want the new column inserted.  (Columns are inserted to the left of the selected column.)

Click Insert on the Menu bar, and then click Columns.

To Insert Rows

Select the row that is under where you want the new row inserted.  (Rows are inserted above the selected row.)

Click Insert on the Menu bar, and then click Rows.

To Insert Worksheets

Click Insert on the Menu bar, and then click Worksheet.

It may then be necessary to rearrange the order of the sheets.  To rearrange the sheets, simply drag the appropriate sheet to its new location.

Deleting Columns, Rows, or New Worksheets

To Delete Columns

Select the column to be deleted by clicking the appropriate column header button. Press the Delete key on the keyboard.

To Delete Rows

Select the row to be deleted by clicking the appropriate row header button. Press the Delete key on the keyboard.

To Delete Worksheets

Select the sheet to be deleted by clicking the appropriate sheet tab.

Click Edit on the Menu bar then click Delete Sheet. Click OK to confirm the deletion.

Be careful when deleting rows, columns, or worksheets because you will delete all data stored in those locations.

6) Formulas:  Entering and Manipulating Data

In order to manipulate data stored in a spreadsheet, you need to create formulas.

Some basic facts about using formulas in Excel are as follows:

All formulas begin with an equal (=) sign. 

Data that is stored in the worksheet and that needs to be used in a formula is referenced using the cell’s address.



The following mathematical operators can be used when creating a formula: +, /, -, and *.  These are in addition to a plethora of built-in functions available to us through Excel such as Average, Minimum, Maximum, Standard Deviation, Sum—just to name a few.

Manual                Calculations

To manually calculate values means using some of the standard mathematical operators and not the built-in functions.  For instance, using the figure on page 5, if I wanted to find the sum of all four quizzes and the final exam, I could enter the following formula in cell H3:

=C3+D3+E3+F3+G3

This would add the values stored in the cells listed in the formula and store the result in cell H3. Once the formula is created, press Enter to actually execute the formula.

Manual calculation formulas work fine for entering a basic formula, but can get labor intensive. Instead, you can use a function to make the job easier.

Functions

A function is a prewritten named formula that takes a value, performs an operation and returns a value. To use built-in function in a formula, type the equal sign in the cell where you wish to store the resulting value, type the name of the function, and then type the argument in parenthesis. The argument is what identifies the range of cells to be included in your formula.

For instance, instead of typing the formula:

=C3+D3+E3+F3+G3

You can use the built-in Sum function to build a formula. To find the sum of all four quizzes and the final exam, I could insert the following formula in cell H3: =SUM(C3:G3)

This would add the values stored in the range of cells listed in the formula and store the result in cell H3. Once the formula is created, press Enter to actually execute the formula.

To Create a Formula Manually

Select the cell that will contain your total, type = (the equal sign) then enter your cell addresses along with any mathematical operators.

To Create a Formula using SUM

Select the cell that will contain your total, click on the AutoSum button on the Standard toolbar.

Excel will put a dotted line around the cells it thinks you want to add. If that is correct, just press the Enter key on the keyboard.  If not, then edit the cell addresses in the formula bar then press the Enter key on the keyboard.

Copying Formulas

All of the instructions for creating a formula involve placing that formula into ONE cell.  Often, a formula can be used basically unchanged in more than one cell.  A formula can be copied to other cells and used effectively by only changing some of the cell references or addresses used in that formula.  For instance, going back to earlier examples, if I wanted to place a formula to calculate the sum of cells C4 through G4 in cell H4 and I already had a formula stored in cell H3 that calculates the sum of cells C3 through G4 then I could use Excel’s AutoFill feature to copy the formula to other locations.

AutoFill is a command you can use when you want to copy the same formula across a range of adjacent cells.  AutoFill will automatically change cell addresses depending on where the new formula is being copied.  In this example, I am only copying the formula in cell H3 down one row to Row 4.  AutoFill would automatically change the cell addresses in the formula to reflect the move to row 4.  AutoFill would just add 1 to the current row references in the formula and leave the column portion of the reference untouched.  If I

were copying the formula down many rows, AutoFill would just keep updating the row references.  This would also apply if I were copying the formula to different columns or to a combination of different rows and columns.

To Use AutoFill

Click on cell that has the formula you want to select it.

Move the mouse pointer to the bottom right corner of the cell.  Place the mouse pointer on the dark square found in the corner. You will know when you are there because a solid black cross will appear instead of your pointer.

Then hold down your left mouse button and drag your pointer across the cells you want to AutoFill. As you drag across, you will see a dotted line appear around the cells.

Once you’ve highlighted the cells you want to AutoFill, release your mouse button. The totals will fill in.

When you use the AutoFill feature, Excel is adapting the formula to the new Relative position for each cell address.

Excel recognizes two types of cell references when it is creating a formula: Relative and Absolute. A Relative Reference is a type of cell reference we have been working with up to this point.  It means that if you copy or move a formula from one cell to another, Excel modifies the formula automatically for the new position.  An Absolute Reference is a type of cell reference that means if you copy or move the formula to another cell, the cell reference will not change.   You can use an absolute reference to keep both the row and column in a cell address from changing or you can break it up and keep either the row or the column from changing. Absolute references are good to use when you have a formula value that will only be changed occasionally and is used in several formulas.  For instance, if you usually have 1000 possible points in your grading scale, you would want to store the 1000 in a cell and use an absolute reference to it in all your formulas that calculate the average using the 1000 possible points.  That way, if you ever change the possible points to something say 1050 then you will only need to change the value in the one cell instead of in several formulas.

To Create an Absolute Reference

To create an absolute reference in a formula, type a $ before the letter (column reference) and/or the number (row reference) in the cell’s address for example $F$5 or $C6 or G$7. 

7) Apply cell formatting.

More Cell Formatting

If you get a number that shows too many decimal places (or not enough) you can easily have Excel add or remove some places.  Excel will even take care of the rounding for you. 

To Increase/Decrease Decimal Places

Select the cell that contains the number to be formatted.

Click either the Increase Decimal or the Decrease Decimal button on the Formatting toolbar as many times as you need to show the correct decimal places.

8) Printing

Setting the Print Area:

Once you have entered all of your data, calculated your formulas, created your charts and formatted your spreadsheet, you are ready to print.

To Print a Selection

Highlight everything in your spreadsheet you want to print. This includes your title, headings, data field and charts.

Click File on the Menu bar then click Print.

Select the Selection radio button in the Print what section.

Click OK.

To Print a Sheet

Make sure you are viewing the sheet you wish to print.

Click File on the Menu bar then click Print.

Select the Active sheet(s) radio button in the Print what section. Click OK.

NOTE:  Keep in mind that a sheet may have many pages. 

To Print an Entire Workbook

Click File on the Menu bar then click Print.

Select the Entire workbook radio button in the Print what section.

Click OK.

To Select Page Orientation (Portrait or Landscape) Click File on the Menu bar then click Page Setup.

Click the Page tab, if necessary.

In the Orientation section, click either the Portrait radio button or the Landscape radio button. Then click Print to actually print at that time or click OK to continue working. 

To Use Print Preview

Click the Print Preview button on the Standard toolbar.

 Click the Close button on the Print Preview toolbar to exit Print Preview.

9) Window Spilt & Freeze

Many a times, one wants to refer to two different sections of a worksheet. For example, in case of a long list, the headings might scroll up. In that event, one can consider to split the window into two parts. One can position the cell pointer to the cell where one desires a split and choose the command Split from the Window Menu.

To remove the split choose Window>Unsplit.

While the movement of the split windows is synchronized, none of them is fixed.

Therefore, it is possible to loose track of the titles if the mouse movements are not

properly handled. To avoid such a situation, one can choose Window>Freeze Panes.

To reverse the process, choose Window->Unfreeze Panes.

10) Auto Correct

The                AutoCorrect                       feature automatically corrects common

typing errors as you type. For this purpose, Excel uses a database of commonly misspelled words. This database can be

customized from the Tools -> AutoCorrect Menu. The following screen comes up:

One can use the AutoCorrect feature to quickly type some normal text which is regularly used in an organization. For example, the organization name can be made a subject matter of AutoCorrect to speeden up data entry.

11) Auto Fill

AutoFill is an in-built feature whereby one can fill up a particular range of cells based on some pre-determined series. For example, if one cell contains January and the next one contains February, one can just use the fill handle to automatically complete the entire range with the month names. One can create custom lists pertaining to one’s organization.

12) Data Validation

At times, there may be a need to restrict the content that is being typed into a particular cell. For example, one may want the residential status to be either “Resident” or “Resident but Not Ordinarily Resident” or “Non Resident”. In such a case, the entry into a particular cell can be validated through the “Data Validation” Feature. The steps for data validation feature are explained below:

1.  Select the cell/range for which validation is to be applied

2.  Choose Data -> Validation from the menu. The following screen appears

3.  This feature validates only Keyboard Input that too in cases where the

    entry is made after the validations are set and hence may have limitations

4.  The user can choose the type of data and the range of data (which may be    open-ended from one side). Alternatively, the user can specify a predefined     list to choose from

5.  The user can also specify the action to be taken in case the data entered is invalid

    ”STOP” does not permit entry of invalid Data

    “WARNING” allows alteration to invalid data. The user may still     continue with the invalid data

   “INFORMATION” just informs about the invalid data

    Unchecking the “CHECK BOX” on the top allows entry of invalid     data without any disturbance

13) Sum Function

The ideal way to total a particular range of numbers is therefore to use the SUM() function. The standard usage of the SUM function has already been considered. Of importance to note is the fact that one can total multiple non-contiguous ranges using a single SUM function. Just separate the range addresses by a comma. One can also use range names instead of the cell attributes to make the function more meaningful for the users.

Quick Sum

Many a times, one just wants to refer to the total of a particular range of cells. For this purpose, one need not insert the SUM function and delete it thereafter. MS-EXCEL presents built-in totals on selection of a range at the status bar which appears at the bottom of the sheet. Even the Quicksum feature can be customized to show either the total or the maximum, minimum, average, count, numeric counts and so on. To customize the Quicksum feature, right click at the place where the sum is displayed and the following options appear:

Sub Total

In case there are nested totals, the SUM function can create havoc as there would be multiple totals. In such a situation one can consider the use of SUBTOTAL() function. This function avoids the cascading effect of the SUM function by recognizing the multilayered totaling feature. Accordingly, a subtotal function ignores the value of another subtotal function in the selected range of cells. The subtotal function is not restricted merely to the summation but can also be used for counts, etc. Accordingly, the SUBTOTAL() Function requires an additional argument which is the function number.

The various function numbers and the action performed by them are tabulated below:

Accordingly, to get a subtotal of the cells in A2 to A9, one will use the function

=SUBTOTAL(9,A2:A9)

14) Sort

In case a list of data is typed, one may need the data arranged in a particular fashion. For example, you may want your client details either alphabetically or based on the client

codes. This is where sorting is useful and the same is very simple. Choose the relevant command from the Data Menu and the Sort Wizard takes you through the rest of the process. Remember, sorted data is always advantageous from three counts: firstly, it improves readability, secondly, it permits effective lookups and lastly, it lays down the foundation for data grouping and sub-totaling.

Sorting is a permanent process as compared to filtering which is a temporary process

Choose any cell in the data range and Select Data -> Sort

Choose successive sort keys and sort order

On a brief review of the above screen, one understands that the sort function permits sorting only upto three levels of data. If sorting is required for multiple levels of data, then one will have to use the sort function more than once. Sort first based on keys of least significance and move to keys of higher significance.

15) Sub-Totals

At times, there is a need to not only have grand totals but also subtotals – would you not like to have group-wise outstanding as well as total outstanding? For this purpose, one can use the Subtotals Function in the Data Menu. The Function is versatile and permits to have multiple levels of subtotals (for having such multiple levels, do not replace the current subtotals). Only care required is to sort the list in the same order of subtotaling before using the subtotals command otherwise you might end up in a mess. One can also consider the use of page-break option if you want individual reports for individual groups. And if things appear messy, just remove all subtotals and Start Afresh!

To subtotal data in a spreadsheet follow these steps:

1.  Decide upon the column you wish to use for the subtotal.

2.  Sort the data using the criterion you selected in step 1.

3.  Select Data/Subtotal. Complete the subtotal window that appears and clickOK.

4.  Subtotals will now appear in the spreadsheet. Subtotals can be isolated fromraw data using the gray view bar to the left. Clicking the (-) boxes will reduce data, clicking the (+) box will restore data.

5.  Clicking the small 1,2,3, boxes in the upper left corner will reduce or expandall categories of data simultaneously.

6.  To remove subtotals select Data/Subtotal and click on the “Remove All”button.

16) Auto Filter

In case of multiple records and large databases, there may be a need to restrict the report to certain types of transactions. For example, if you are maintaining your sale details in MS-EXCEL, you may be interested in a quick list of all the sales made to a particular customer. This requirement is known as a query. Again, Excel has an excel-lent (!) feature to do this. One just needs to use it to believe it. Yes, we are talking of AutoFilter – the feature which displays a subset of data without actually sorting or moving data. Once you select the AutoFilter command from the Data Menu, Excel inserts drop down arrows next to column headings in the list. Selecting an item from a drop down list hides all rows except rows that contain the selected value. One can edit and format the cells which are visible.



  Choose any cell in the data range and Select Data -> Filter -> AutoFilter

  Use the drop down lists to specify criteria. Criteria can be

1.  Particular Value

2.  Top/Bottom (no of items) in terms of value or percentage

3.  Range through Custom Criteria

4.  Blanks/ Non-Blanks

  Various criteria in differing columns are cumulative (AND) condition

  Remove criteria in specific column by choosing “All” from the drop down list

  Remove criteria in all columns by choosing Data -> Filter -> Show All

17) Advanced Filter

The filtered data can also be copied into another area by the simple process of copy-paste. One limitation of AutoFilter is that one can have multiple alternative criteria (OR condition to be more specific) for a single field, one can also have cumulative multiple criteria (AND condition) across multiple fields but one cannot have alternative multiple criteria across various fields. To cover such complex searches, one has to take recourse to the Advanced Filter Option. Here, one specifies the conditions in a separate range known as the criterion range. The results can be filtered in the original list or in another range of cells.

Useful for specifying criteria which are alternative in nature (OR) condition

Make use of a “criteria range”

Select Data -> Filter -> Advanced Filter

The filtered data may be copied to another range for subsequent analysis

Revert back to original data by choosing Data -> Filter -> Show All

The Advanced Filter can also be used to delete duplicate records in Microsoft Excel. For this one needs to filter for unique records and then use the resulting rows to overwrite the source cells. The entire procedure is summarized in the table given below:

1.  In the list you want to filter, select the column or click a cell.

2.  On the Data menu, point to Filter, and then click Advanced Filter.

3.  In the Advanced Filter dialog box, click Copy to another location.

4.  In the Copy to box, type a cell reference.

5.  Select the Unique records only check box, and then click OK.

6.  Select the data returned by the filter, and then click Cut on the toolbar.

7.  Select the source data, and then click Paste on the toolbar.

18) Text Functions

Function

Description

Concatenate

Joins several text strings into one text string.

Exact

Checks whether 2 strings are exactly the same and returns True or False. (Its case sensitive)

Dollar

Converts a number to text, using currency format.

Left

Returns the specified number of characters from the start of a text string.

Right

Returns the specified number of characters from the end of a text string.

Mid

Returns the characters from the middle of a text string, given a starting position and length.

Upper

Converts a text string to all uppercase letters.

Lower

Converts a text string to all lowercase letters.

Len

Returns the number of characters in a text string.

Proper

Converts a text string to proper case, the first letter in each word in uppercase and all other in

lowercase.

Replace

Replaces part of a text string with a different text string.

Rept

Repeats text a given number of times.

Trim

Removes all spaces from a text string except for a single space between the words.

19) USEFUL FUNCTIONS

The functions we shall look at first are:

AVERAGE

COUNT

COUNTA

COUNTBLANK

COUNTIF

MAX

MIN

SUMIF

We will start each description with what the function does, followed by its syntax and then the number of arguments it can accept. It is important to note that while some functions take more than one argument it is not always the case that they must all be supplied.

These arguments are known as option arguments and I will identify these in the syntax description by not bolding the argument. For example the SUM function can take up to 30 arguments, but only one of the thirty needs to be supplied, so I would show this as below, eg:

Syntax SUM(number1,number2, ) Meaning “number2,…. to number 30” are all optional arguments while “number1” must be supplied.

AVERAGE

The AVERAGE function is used to return the average of the arguments supplied.

Syntax

AVERAGE(number1,number2, )

The AVERAGE function can take up to 30 arguments.

The arguments supplied must be numeric or references to numeric values. Text and/or references to text are ignored. It is important to note that cells containing zeros are NOT ignored. This can give you unexpected results if you are not aware of it.

=AVERAGE(A1:A3) would equal 10 if A1:A3 contained 5, 10, 15 respectively

COUNT

The COUNT function is used to count numbers or references to numbers in a range.

Syntax

COUNT(value1,value2, )

The COUNT function takes up to 30 arguments and each argument can be a variety of data types, but only numbers are counted.

If the range reference supplied contains valid dates these will also be counted.

=COUNT(A1:A5) would equal 3 if cells A1:A5 contained 10, 12/12/2001, house, 0, dog

COUNTA

The COUNTA function is used to count non-empty cells.

Syntax

COUNTA(value1,value2, )

The COUNTA function takes up to 30 arguments and each argument should be a reference to a range. Cells within the range can be a variety of data types, but only non-empty cells are counted.

=COUNTA(A1:A5) would equal 4 if cells A1:A5 contained , 12/12/2001, house, 0, dog.  In other words A1 is empty and so is not counted while all other cells are.

COUNTBLANK

The COUNTBLANK function is used to count empty cells. It is the opposite of the COUNTA function Syntax

COUNTBLANK(range)

The COUNTBLANK function takes 1 argument and this argument should be a reference to a range. Cells within the range can be a variety of data types, but only empty cells are counted

=COUNTBLANK(A1:A5) would equal 1 if cells A1:A5 contained , 12/12/2001, house, 0, dog In other words A1 is empty and so is counted while all other cells are not.

COUNTIF

The COUNTIF function is used to count cells within a range that meet a specified criterion.

Syntax COUNTIF(range,criteria)

The COUNTIF function takes two (2) arguments. The range argument is a reference to a range of cells, while the criteria argument is the criterion that should be met by the cells within range before they are counted. The criteria specified can be in the form of a number, text or an expression.

Number criteria

=COUNTIF(A1:A5,20) would equal 1 if cells A1:A5 contained 15, 22, 20, 0, dog

In other words A3 is the only cell that meets the criteria of 20

Text criteria

=COUNTIF(A1:A5,”dog”) would equal 1 if cells A1:A5 contained 15, 22, 20, 0, dog

In other words A5 is the only cell that meets the criteria of “dog

Expression criteria

=COUNTIF(A1:A5,”<20”) would equal 2 if cells A1:A5 contained 15, 22, 20, 0, dog. In other words A1 and A4 are the only cells that meets the criteria of “<20”.

MAX

The MAX function is used to return the largest number from a set of values.

Syntax

MAX(number1,number2, )

The MAX function takes up to 30 arguments and will ignore text.

=MAX(A1:A5) would equal 10 if cells A1:A5 contained 9, 8, house, 10, -10

MIN

Opposite to Max, the MIN function is used to return the smallest number from a set of values.

Syntax

MIN(number1,number2, )

The MIN function takes up to 30 arguments and will ignore text.

=MIN(A1:A5) would equal 1 if cells A1:A5 contained 9, 8, house, 10, 1.

SUMIF

The SUMIF function is used to return the sum value from a specified range that meets a criterion.

Syntax

SUMIF(range,criteria,sum_range)

The SUMIF takes up to 3 arguments. The range is the range of cells to evaluate to see if they meet the specified criteria. The criteria specified can be in the form of a number, text or an expression. The sum_range is the range of cells to sum, but only if the corresponding cells in the range meet the specified criteria. If sum_range is omitted then the cells within the range are summed. =SUMIF(A1:A5,5) would equal 10 if cells A1:A5 contained 5, 8, house, 10, 5

In other words cells A1 and A5 would be summed as they meet the criteria and NO sum_range was supplied.

=SUMIF(A1:A5,5,B1:B5) would equal 20 if cells A1:A5 contained 5, 8, 1, 9, 5 and cells B1:B5 contained 10,1,3,8,10.

In other words cells B1 and B5 would be summed as the corresponding cells in A1:A5 have a value of 5. =SUMIF(A1:A5,”Cat”,B1:B5) would equal 15 if cells A1:A5 contained Cat, cat, Cat, 9, 5 and cells B1:B5 contained 5,5,5,8,11

In other words cells B1,B2 and B3 would be summed as the corresponding cells in A1:A5 contain the text “Cat” (not case sensitive).

=SUMIF(A1:A5,”>5”) would equal 34 if cells A1:A5 contained 10, 15, Cat, 9, 5 and In other words cells A1 and A5 would be summed as they meet the criteria of being greater than 5.

20) WORKSHEET PROTECTION

Worksheet protection is a very valuable and useful tool, but using it can sometimes seem a little confusing, as there are actually two separate processes that must be followed to protect data.

The first step is to unlock any cells that will require editing. The second step is to apply Worksheet Protection.

Enabling Worksheet Protection

Let’s have a look at how we would apply Worksheet protection to the file ABC.xls that we used previously, and how we would unlock the December figures for each Department, so that they can type their own figures in there.

As a default, all cells within Excel are locked by default. However, you can still change or edit these cells because the Worksheet or Workbook is unprotected. The first step to using data protection is to unlock the cells that need to be changed when we apply Worksheet Protection.

Open the file ABC.xls if it is not already open.

If you need to, move your pie chart out of the way using the technique described above so that you can see the range M3:M6.

Highlight the range A3:A6 with your mouse, then go to Format>Cells which will display the Format Cells dialog box, and select the Protection tab.

You have two options within this box. The first option Locked, if selected, will prevent a user from changing, moving, resizing or deleting the selected cells. The second option Hidden, if selected, will hide the formulas within your Worksheet so that if a cell containing a formula is selected, you will not be able to see what the formula is in the formula bar. Let’s select the Locked option until it appears without a tick., then click on OK to unlock our selected cells (M3:M6).

Now we have unlocked our cells, we can apply Worksheet Protection to our data.

Select Tools>Protection/Protect Sheet and the Protect Sheet dialog box will appear.

Depending on which version of Excel you are using, the options may be slightly different in the Protect Sheet dialog.  We do not wish to use a password at this stage, and we will just accept the defaults as they are in this case, so just click OK.

OK, let’s have a go at using our protected Worksheet.

Click in cell L3 and type the number 1234. You will notice that as soon as you start to type, Excel will display a message that tells you the cell or chart you are trying to change is protected and therefore read-only. Now click in cell M3 and type 1234, then Enter. This time your entry will be allowed, as would any entry that you typed in M4, M5, or M6.

You will note that when you make a change to either M3, M4, M5, or M6, that the formula in M7 will update. This is because locked cells that contain formulas will still change in accordance with the data that is used to calculate them.

Disabling Worksheet Protection

You can unprotect a Worksheet in the same way that you protected it in the first place.

Go to Tools>Protection.

As the Worksheet is already protected, your sub-menu will contain a command to unprotect your Worksheet, so let’s select Unprotect Sheet.

OK, so we have looked now at Worksheet Protection.  However anyone with a working knowledge of Excel, could figure out how to unprotect a sheet if they wanted to, so Excel offers you the ability to use a password to protect your Sheet. Passwords are case-sensitive. One thing you MUST be aware of when using a password is that if you lose or forget your password, it cannot be recovered, so it might be a good idea to write down your passwords somewhere and the Worksheets that they relate to and store them in a safe place.  It is also a good idea when using a password to use a combination of letters, numbers and symbols.

Select Tools>Protection/Protect Sheet.

Click in the Password  box and type in the word password then click OK.

Excel will ask you to confirm your password by retyping it, so lets retype in the word password then select OK.

Now click in N3 and type in 1234 as before you cannot make a change here, and a message box will pop up telling you so.

Now click in M3 and type in 5678 and click Enter. As before, no warning will appear and you are able to change cell M3.

Let’s try and unprotect our sheet now.

Select Tools>Protection/Unprotect Sheet.

You must now type in the correct password for your sheet to be unprotected. Type in the word passwording, then click on OK.

You will get an error message from Excel advising you that the password that you typed is incorrect. You will also get a hint from Excel, that maybe the caps lock key could be on, just in case you have typed the right password in the wrong case.

Click on OK and we will try again.

Select Tools>Protection/Unprotect Sheet and type in the correct password (password).

Select OK and your Worksheet will now be unprotected again.

So remember, if you want to use the Protect facility, you must remember to unlock the cells that you wish to be changed before your apply sheet protection. You can protect a Worksheet with or without a password, but remember that the password does not prevent access to the data, but instead prevents the worksheet being unprotected. Once the protection system is in place, it is impossible for a user to edit, change or delete the contents of a locked cell.

21) Conditional Formatting

Conditional formatting permits the user to apply special formatting settings that take

effect when the contents of the cell meet specified conditions. For instance, if there is a loss under a particular head, you intend to color it red so that it immediately catches your attention. Similarly, you may like to color your balance sheet totals to blue if they do not tally. One very practical tip is to combine the ISERROR function with the Conditional Formatting feature to hide errors. What is effectively done is that the font and the background is set to the same color if the cell contains an error.

Select the range of cells for which the formatting is desired

Choose Format -> Conditional Formatting

Allows different forms of formatting based on the cell contents

Maximum of 3 different conditions can be specified

To suppress errors, choose Formula is =ISERROR() and then choose same color font as the background color

22) Pivot Tables

PivotTable is a very powerful analysis tool built into MS-EXCEL. It helps in analyzing & summarizing large collections of data. Such data can be derived from various sources. The most common choice is to however create a pivot table from an Excel list. For the purpose of understanding, the following Excel list consisting of time sheet records of a professional firm is analysed using PivotTables

Creating a Pivot Table

For creating a PivotTable, choose the PivotTable command from the Data menu. The

PivotTable wizard appears and takes you through the process of creating a PivotTable

Step1: Specify the Data Source: Here we specify either an existing Excel list or an external source of data. We also specify whether we want to create a PivotTable or a PivotChart report. The default choices are generally Excel list and PivotTable. Choose Next to specify the data range.

Step 2: Define the Data Range: Ensure that the correct range of cells has been included.

Click the next button to specify the location of the PivotTable

Step 3: Click on Layout. At this stage, it is necessary to understand certain terms relevant for the purposes of PivotTables. For effective analysis, PivotTable uses the concepts of row & column fields for summarizing and grouping data. The page field could be used to filter out the data on a particular item. The data field contains the summary information. To create the analysis, drag the desired item from the PivotTable Field list and drop it in the relevant section of the main table.

23) Vlookup

In Excel, the VLookup function searches for value in the left-most column of table_array and returns the value in the same row based on the index_number.

The syntax for the VLookup function is:

VLookup( value, table_array, index_number, not_exact_match ) value is the value to search for in the first column of the table_array. table_array is two or more columns of data that is sorted in ascending order.



index_number     is the column                    number                in table_array from which the matching value must be returned. The first column is 1.

not_exact_match determines if you are looking for an exact match based on value. Enter FALSE to find an exact match. Enter TRUE to find an approximate match, which means that if an exact match if not found, then the VLookup function will look for the next largest value that is less than value.

Note:

If index_number is less than 1, the VLookup function will return #VALUE!.

If index_number is greater than the number of columns in table_array, the VLookup function will return #REF!.

If you enter FALSE for the not_exact_match parameter and no exact match is found, then the VLookup function will return #N/A.

To perform mathematical operations on your VLookup results, you need to replace the #N/A error with a 0 value (or something similar). This can be done with a formula that utilizes a combination of the VLookup function, IF function, and ISNA function.

=IF(ISNA(VLOOKUP(E2,$A$2:$C$5,3,FALSE)),0,VLOOKUP(E2,$A$2:$C$5,3,FALSE)) would return 0  First, you need to enter a FALSE in the last parameter of the VLookup function. This will ensure that the VLookup will test for an exact match.

If the VLookup function does not find an exact match, it will return the #N/A error. By using the IF and ISNA functions, you can return the Unit Price value if an exact match is found. Otherwise, a 0 value is returned. This allows you to perform mathematical operations on your VLookup results.

Based on the spreadsheet above:

=IF(ISNA(VLOOKUP(A2,$D$2:$D$185,1,FALSE)),"No","Yes") would return "No"

=IF(ISNA(VLOOKUP(A5,$D$2:$D$185,1,FALSE)),"No","Yes") would return "Yes"

First, you need to enter a FALSE in the last parameter of the VLookup function. This will ensure that the VLookup will test for an exact match.

If the VLookup function does not find an exact match, it will return the #N/A error. By using the IF and ISNA functions, you can return a "Yes" value if an exact match is found. Otherwise, a "No" value is returned.

24) HLookup function

It searches for value in the top row of table_array and returns the value in the same column based on the index_number.

The syntax for the HLookup function is:

HLookup( value, table_array, index_number, not_exact_match ) value is the value to search for in the first row of the table_array. table_array is two or more rows of data that is sorted in ascending order. index_number is the row number in table_array from which the matching value must be returned. The first row is 1.

not_exact_match determines if you are looking for an exact match based on value. Enter FALSE to find an exact match. Enter FALSE to find an approximate match, which means that if an exact match if not found, then the HLookup function will look for the next largest value that is less than value.

Note:

If index_number is less than 1, the HLookup function will return #VALUE!.

If index_number is greater than the number of columns in table_array, the HLookup function will return #REF!.

If you enter FALSE for the not_exact_match parameter and no exact match is found, then the HLookup function will return #N/A.

For example:

Let's take a look at an example:

Based on the Excel spreadsheet above:

                          =HLookup(10251, A1:K3, 2, FALSE)    would return $16.80

                          =HLookup(10251, A1:K3, 3, FALSE)    would return 6

                          =HLookup(10248, A1:K3, 2, FALSE)    would return #N/A

                          =HLookup(10248, A1:K3, 2, TRUE)     would return $14.00

25) Using Charts in Excel

What is a Chart?

A chart is a graphic representation of worksheet data. Presenting information in the form of a chart is often one of the best ways to analyze data as well as call attention to specific entries.

With Excel, you can create several different types of charts. Each type, in turn, can be displayed in a number of different subtypes. Some of the most common chart types include:

                          Column                In a Column chart, vertical bars represent values.

                          Bar                                         In a Bar chart, horizontal bars represent values.

                          Cylinder                               In a Cylinder chart, vertical or horizontal cylinders represent values.

                          Line                                        In a Line chart, points on a line represents values.

                          Scatter                               In a Scatter chart, two sets of values are represented by points (usually on two lines).

                          Area                                      In an Area chart, shaded areas represent values.

                          Pie                                          In a Pie chart, values are represented by slices of a pie (percentages of the whole).

Plotting a basic chart…

With Excel’s Chart Wizard, you can quickly plot a basic chart—that is, a chart containing data markers, a title and a legend. The chart can appear on the worksheet containing the source data or it can appear on a separate chart sheet of its own.

Objective 1: Create a Chart

To Create a Chart using the Chart Wizard

Highlight the data you want to chart, including any headers or labels

Click the Chart Wizard button on the Standard toolbar

From the Chart type list, click type of chart you wish to create

From the Chart sub-type list, click the sub-type you wish to use Click the Next button

Click the Series Tab like to change Series

under the Series dialog box Click Next

Objective 3: The Chart Options Dialog Box

This dialog box shows a sample chart using the data you

selected. Here, you can choose to keep the legend, add a chart title, gridlines, data labels, data table, and add axis titles.



Click Next,

Objective 4: Chart Location Dialog Box

In the Chart Wizard, Step 4 of 4, you determine the placement of the chart in the workbook. You can display a chart as an object on the current sheet, on any other existing sheet, or on a newly created chart sheet.

Click the Radio Button for your choice

Click Finish

Objective 5: Moving & Resizing a Chart

Click the Chart to Select it

Click, Hold, and Drag the chart to the desired position until it docks

Release the left mouse button

Click the legend to select it

Drag the legend until it is aligned with the plot area.

Objective 6: Editing & Enhancing a Chart

Once you have created a chart, it’s easy to modify it to make it easier to read and understand. You can create titles for the x-axis and y-axis, add graphics, add background color, or format the text you use in a chart.

                                                          Chart Objects List                            Chart Type                                Data Table

Make sure yourChart is selected

Click Chart from the Chart Main Menu or Use the Chart Toolbar View, Toolbars, Chart Click Chart type

Click a Chart sub-type

Click the Press and Hold to View Sample button to preview selection

Click OK

Click Chart from the Main Menu

Click Chart Options

Click Titles tab in the Chart Options dialog box, then type a title in the Category (X) axis box

Click the Value (Y) axis text box, type a title, then click OK

Press ESC to deselect the Value-axis title

Click the Chart Title to select it

Click the Format Chart Title button on the Chart toolbar to open the Format Chart Title dialog (If Chart

toolbar is not present, Go to View, Toolbars, Chart)

Make sure the Patterns tab is selected, and then click the Shadow checkbox.

Click the Font tab in the Format Chart Title dialog box, make changes, Click OK

Click the Category Axis Title, Click the Format Object button, click the Font tab,make changes to the Font selection and/or Font Sizes, Click the Alignment tab, then go to the Orientation tab to adjust the text, then click OK

Click the Value Axis Title, Click the Format Object button, Click the Font tab, make changes to the Font selection and/or Font Sizes, Click the Alignment tab, then go to the Orientation tab to adjust the text, Click OK, then press [ESC] to deselect the title

Objective 7:  Customizing a Data Series

A data series is the information, usually numbers or values that Excel plots on a chart. You can customize the data series in a chart easily by altering the spreadsheet range that contains the chart data or by entering descriptive text, called a data label that appears above a data marker in a chart.

If necessary, Click the Chart to select it

Click the Chart Objects list arrow in the Chart toolbar, then click Series

Click the Format Object button on the Chart toolbar,

Click the Data Labels tab in the Format Data Series dialog box

Under Data Labels, click the Show value and/or Show label option buttonto select it then click OK.

Click the Chart Objects list arrow on the Chart toolbar, click a Series, click the Format Object button, then click the Patterns tab in the Format Data Series dialog box.

Area choices of color

Under Area, click a color choice, click OK, press [ESC} to deselect the data series, press [ESC] again to deselect the entire chart.

Objective 8: Formatting a Chart Axis

Excel automatically plots and formats all chart data and places chart axes within the chart’s plot area. Data values in two-dimensional charts are plotted on the value (y) axis and categories are plotted on the category (x) axis. You can override any of these settings by following these steps.

Click the Chart, click the Chart Objects list arrow on the Chart toolbar, then click Value Axis.

Click the Format Object button on the Chart toolbar, then click the Scale tab

Note: The check marks under Auto indicate the default scale settings. You can override any of these settings by entering a new value.

In the boxes, type desired values for Maximum, Minimum, and Increment units, then click OK. 

With the Value Axis still selected, click Format Object button on the Chart toolbar, then click the Number tab

Under Category click General, click OK, press [Esc] twice

Minimum Maximum Objective 9: Adding a Data Table to a Chart

Value Value (z) axis Value

with scale A data table, attached to the bottom of a chart, is a grid containing the chart data. Data tables are useful because they highlight the data used to generate a chart, which might otherwise be difficult to find. They can be displayed in line, area, column, and bar charts, and print automatically along with a chart.

Click the Chart to select it, click Chart on the menu bar, click Chart Options, then click the Data Table tab

Click the Show data table check box to select it

Click OK, then, if necessary, scroll down to display the chart

If necessary, click the chart to select it, click Chart on the menu bar, click Location, click the As new sheet option buttonunder Place chart, click OK

Click the Arrow button on the Drawing toolbar (The pointer changes to + and the status bar displays “Click and drag to insert an AutoShape.” When you draw an arrow, the point farthest from where you start will have the arrowhead.)

Position + under your text selection in the text box, press and hold the left mouse button Drag the line to the designated point, then release the mouse button.

Click anywhere to close the Drawing toolbar or

Objective 12: Enhancing a Chart with WordArt

You can enhance your chart or worksheet by adding specially formatted text using the WordArt tool on the Drawing toolbar.

Click the Insert a WordArt button on the Drawing toolbar

Select a WordArt style, Click OK

Type new text, Click the Font selection to change formatting,

Click OK

Move & Resize Word Art where you like

Press [Esc] to deselect the WordArt






Objective 13: Previewing and Printing a Chart

After you complete a chart to your satisfaction, you will need to print it. Previewing a chart gives you a chance to see what your chart looks like before you print it. You can print a chart by itself, or as a part of the worksheet.

Note: If you want to print only the chart without the date, leave the chart selected.

Print Preview

Click the Print Preview button on the Standard toolbar, or go to File, Print Preview.

If you want to change the Orientation of the printout…

Click Setup on the Print Preview Toolbar

Click the Page tab

If necessary, Click the Landscape option radio button

Click OK

Click the Print tab to display the Print dialog box, then click OK

Note: When a chart is selected, you can accurately position a chart on the page by setting the desired margin lines.

Change Margins

From the Print Preview Toolbar, Click the Margins tab

Press and hold the mouse button on the margin

Drag the lines to the exact setting you want

Click the Print tab to display the Print dialog box, then click OK

26) Establishing Links Between Worksheets or Workbooks

The simple Edit, Paste command places copied content in a new location. Choosing Edit, Paste Special enables you to create a link between the source and target worksheets or workbooks.

NOTE

You can establish one or more links within a single worksheet, enabling you to enter repeated information once and have it update to one or more additional cells automatically.

To copy and link content between worksheets or workbooks in Excel, follow these steps:

When copying between workbooks, be sure both workbooks are open and have been saved.

Select and copy the source content in the source worksheet. This content will become the linked object. Move to the target worksheet, select the cell where you want the linked data to begin, and choose Edit, Paste Special to open the Paste Special dialog box.

In most cases, use the All option that's selected by default when creating a paste link.

Make any selections pertaining to the content and formatting you want to include in the pasted material. In most cases, the default All selection is exactly what you need.

Click the Paste Link button. Note that this button doesn't open another dialog box, as you might expect. Instead, it immediately executes the link.

After linking a source and target, test the link by switching to the source cells and making a change to their content. Check the target, and see that the change is reflected. When viewing the target, notice that the Formula bar shows the link, listing the source location, as shown in Figure 3.24. The workbook name appears in brackets ([ ]), followed by the worksheet name with an exclamation point (!) and the range name or cell reference.

In this example, the link is as follows:

=[]Table!D8

The source workbook's name is (.xls is the file's extension).

The source worksheet is named TABLE.

The source cell is D8.

If the source workbook is closed, the link formula also includes the full path to the source file.

NOTE

If you paste link blank cells, Excel displays 0 for the blank cell in the target location. To suppress the display of zeros, choose Tools, Options, click the View tab, and deselect the Zero Values option.

Updating Links to a Workbook

When you open a workbook that contains one or more links to other workbooks, you'll be prompted to update the links—that is, update the target to reflect any changes made in the source, as shown in Figure 3.25. You are prompted to update links only when one or more of the source workbooks are closed. If they're all open at the time you open the file containing links, Excel automatically updates the links. If you prefer, you can choose to keep the file's existing content intact and update the links later, as needed.

When a target cell is selected, the Formula bar displays the source filename, sheet name, and cell address.

If you aren't the primary editor of the source document, it might be safer to choose Don't Update, and then check the source document before updating the linked data.

To update a link between two workbooks after the target has been opened, follow these steps:

In the document containing the linked material (the target), choose Edit, Links to display the Links dialog box.

Links can be edited only from within the target document. The Links command is disabled in the Edit menu if you attempt to access it from the source document or any unlinked workbook.

In the Links dialog box, click the link you want to update in the Source File list.

It's a good idea to save the workbook before updating any links. If you regret having updated them, you can close the file without saving.

Click the Update Values button. Click Close.

TIP

To quickly update all links with one fast keystroke, press F9 in the workbook that contains linked data. Note, however, that this technique is useful only when the following conditions are in place:

The workbook containing the links has calculation set to Manual (choose Tools, Options, click the Calculation tab, and select Manual).

The source workbook is open. Keep in mind that if you've set your calculations to Manual none of the calculations will work unless you press F9.

Locking Linked External Data

Worksheets can occasionally include links to OLE-compatible applications other than Excel. To prevent accidental updates of these links, you can lock the links. Choose Tools, Options to open the Options dialog box, and click the Calculation tab. Remove the check mark in the Update Remote References box. To resume updates in the future, turn the option back on.

Redirecting Links

If you rename a workbook to which other workbooks are linked, the links break. You can repair the broken links by redirecting them to the renamed file. To do so, move to the target document (the workbook that contains the links) and choose Edit, Links. Click the Change Source button, and choose the appropriate file from the Change Links dialog box. By default, the cell addresses that were copied will be retained. Breaking Links Between Files

You can break links by choosing Edit, Links, Break Link. Most broken links occur accidentally—the user changes the name of either the source or target file or moves one or both files to a new folder. Any change in name or location of either the source or target file will result in a broken link.

27) Macros

Topics: -               Moving around in Excel (Navigating) 

Recording a Macro

Limitations

Referential versus Absolute

Find and Replace

Shortcut-Keys

Menu/Toolbar Options

Editing a Macro

Deleting a Macro

There are three distinct text modes in Excel.  To be able to tell what mode is current, look at the status bar, in the bottom left corner of the screen.

- Excel is usually in Ready mode.  This means nothing is being entered or edited on the spreadsheet, but you can format the cell(s).

- Excel changes to Enter mode when you indicate you want to enter information.  Either by clicking into the formula bar, double clicking on a blank cell or simply by beginning to type in any cell. In Enter mode, the text navigation keys (arrows, home/end) work on the spreadsheet level moving you between cells.

- Excel changes to Edit mode when you double click on a cell with data in it, or when you press the F2 key on the keyboard.  Edit mode allows you to use the text navigation keys (arrows, home/end) to move among the characters.

The arrow keys on the keyboard

In Ready/Enter mode they will move you up, down, left and right by one cell

Shift and the arrows, it will select a range of cells as you move

Ctrl and the arrows moves to the edge of the current data region (where the data stops/starts)

Shift-Ctrl and arrows will select to the edge of the current data region

In Edit mode – will move you up, down, left and right within the cell (if you only have one line of text the up and down arrows have no effect)

Shift and the arrows will select text in that direction (from where the cursor was blinking)

Ctrl and the left and right arrows will move word by word

Shift-Ctrl and the left and right arrows will select text, word by word

Esc (escape) acts as a cancel; if you are editing/entering a cell, escape will go back to enter mode ignoring any changes you have made.  This is the same as clicking the red X on the formula bar.

Tab moves right to a cell (if in Edit/Enter mode, Tab will accept changes and move right) Shift-Tab moves left

Ctrl-Tab moves you to another Workbook (another open file)

Alt-Tab moves you to another open application (program such as MS Word)

Enter moves down a cell (if in Edit/Enter mode, Enter will accept changes and move down) Shift-Enter moves up

In Edit/Enter Mode

Alt-Enter forces a cell to put text on a second line

Ctrl-Enter accepts changes and remains on that cell. This is the same as clicking the green ? on the formula bar.     

Page Up & Page Down moves a screenful up or down, respectfully

Ctrl-Page Up & Ctrl-Page Down moves to the previous or next Worksheet, respectfully Alt-Page Up & Alt-Page Down moves a screenful left or right, respectively

Home Edit Mode -

Home moves to the beginning of the cell

Shift-Home will select from where the cursor is blinking to the beginning of the cell

Enter/Ready Mode -

Home moves to the first column

Shift-Home will select from the current cell to the first column

Ctrl-Home will move to the very top of your worksheet

Shift-Ctrl-Home will select from the current cell to the very top of the worksheet

End Edit Mode –

End will move to the end of the cell

Shift-End will select from where the cursor is blinking to the end of the cell

Ctrl-End moves to the last working cell on the worksheet, which is the cell at the intersection of the rightmost used column and the bottom-most used row (in the lower-right corner) Shift-Ctrl-End will select to the last (working) cell on the spreadsheet

Using the Mouse & Keyboard

Clicking on any cell will make it the current cell.

Double clicking on a blank cell will put that cell into enter mode, double clicking on a cell with data in it will put that cell in edit mode.

If you use Shift and the mouse you can select a range (a set of conjoining cells).  Click where you want to start, hold down the Shift key and click where you want to stop.  Every cell in between will be selected.

If you use the Ctrl and the mouse you can select various cells.  (skipping ones in between).  You cannot use these in equations but you can apply to formatting (change several cells to red text).

To run the macro by pressing a keyboard shortcut key, enter a letter in the Shortcut key box, either when you create the macro, or later from the Options button on the Macro Window. You can use CTRL+ letter or CTRL+SHIFT+ letter, where letter is any letter key on the keyboard. The shortcut key will override any default Microsoft Excel shortcut keys while the workbook that contains the macro is open.

Tools-Macro-Record New Macro                Tools-Macro-Macros…-(select macro)-Options

Ctrl-A – Select All

Ctrl-B – Bold

Ctrl-C – Copy

Ctrl-D – Fill down

Ctrl-E – Unassigned

Ctrl-F – Find

Ctrl-G – Goto

Ctrl-H – Replace

Ctrl-I – Italicize

Ctrl-J – Unassigned

Ctrl-K – Hyperlink

Ctrl-L – Unassigned

Ctrl-M – Unassigned

Ctrl-N – New Workbook

Ctrl-O – Open Workbook

Ctrl-Shift-O – Select Cells with Comments

Ctrl-P – Print

Ctrl-R – Fill to the right

Ctrl-S – Save

Ctrl-T – Unassigned

Ctrl-U – Underline

Ctrl-V – Paste

Ctrl-W – Close Workbook

Ctrl-X – Cut

Ctrl-Y – Redo/Repeat the last action

Ctrl-Z – Undo

Macro is a series of commands executed from just one command from the user.  You can use Excel’s macros to automate tasks that you find yourself repeatedly doing. 

Record a new macro

From the Tools menu, choose Macro, Record New Macro… and you will get this dialog box:

The first step is to give your macro a descriptive name. You cannot use spaces, dashes (hyphens) or other special characters in your macro name, if you try, you will get an "That name is invalid" error message.  You can use underscores ( _ ) in place of spaces/dashes. (i.e. Page_Setup or Delete_Spaces will work).

Next decide where to store the macro.  You can save it in the current workbook (This Workbook).  This choice will attach this macro to the current workbook, and it will only be accessible when this workbook is open.  If you want to be able to use the macro from any workbook on that computer, choose the "Personal Macro Workbook". 

Decide if you want a shortcut key assigned to this Macro. If you do not want a shortcut key, leave the option blank, and click OK to begin recording your macro.

If desired, you can enter a description to better explain what this macro will do.

Recording a Macro

After you’ve named your macro, Excel takes you back into your spreadsheet.  There are a few clues that show you are recording.  The biggest is your mouse now has a tape cassette attached to it.

You will also have a new toolbar floating on your screen. If you would like you can move the toolbar without affecting the macro, by clicking and dragging the blue title bar of the toolbar.

This new toolbar only has two buttons, Stop and Use Relative Reference.  If you click the X to close this menu, Excel will stop recording the macro.  You can also stop recording by clicking Stop.

The Use Relative Reference button determines whether the Macro recorder uses relative or absolute references to the cells on a worksheet.  The button is set to Absolute when it's first shown.  This means that Excel will record the exact address.  Absolute references do not automatically adjust when you insert rows and columns.   When the button is pushed, Excel will keep track of a Relative Reference.  This means Excel will record the macro, relative to where you start.  It is very possible to switch between modes while recording your macro.

Once you have completed all the steps that you wanted to automate, stop the macro.

You should test the macro to make sure that it works, if you assigned a keyboard shortcut, use that, otherwise go through the menu, Tools-Macros-Macros… (Alt-F8), choose the macro and Run.

If you Edit the macro you will actually see the visual basic code.  This is also the window where you can delete a macro.

If you have saved your macro in the as the macro show above was, then you will not be able to delete the macro yet, you will have to unhide the personal workbook.

Window->Unhide->->OK

Once you are in this Worksheet, you can delete the macros saved here, just be sure to hide this worksheet again when you are done. (Window->Hide)

Adding Toolbars and Buttons

To add a toolbar, choose Tools-Customize, click on the Toolbar tab.  Click the new button:

You'll get a blank toolbar such as this one.

To add buttons to the toolbar switch to the Commands tab, on the Customize Window.

If the button you desire already exists you can click and drag the button to the toolbar.  As you drag the button to the toolbar, you will see an I marker on the toolbar to indicate where it's placing the button.

If you would like to add the buttons for your macros, scroll to the bottom of the categories list. Choose Macros and drag over the Custom Button that is a happy face.

To assign the button to your macro, make sure the button is highlighted, as shown here (it has the box around it), from the Customize window choose Modify Selection.  Choose Assign Macro…, Select the macro you want for this button, and click OK.

To change the way the button looks, so you don't have 10 happy face buttons, click on the Modify Selection button again.  You can Change the Button Image, or give the button an appropriate Name and tell Excel to use Text Only or Image and Text

You can also copy and paste an existing button image and even Edit the Button Image to create your own graphical button.



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